Salisbury trust reports ‘familiarity’ issue with EPR

digital health
“The Trust has experienced some initial problems bedding in the new Electronic Patient Record system and acknowledges that there have been some issues relating to the speed and familiarity of the new system among staff,” a spokesperson for Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust told BJ-HC

The trust’s most recent board papers show difficulties in using the new system

[Salisbury, UK] Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust staff have encountered several issues while trying to access an electronic patient record (EPR) system after it first went live in November last year.

The trust’s most recent board papers show that a number of departments have been reporting difficulties in getting to grasp with CSC's Lorenzo EPR system, although a spokesperson has confirmed that action plans have been put in place to address these problems:

“The Trust has experienced some initial problems bedding in the new Electronic Patient Record system and acknowledges that there have been some issues relating to the speed and familiarity of the new system among staff.

“The Trust has introduced additional training and greater IT support in clinical areas and CSC have agreed to assist staff in a number of areas over the coming weeks to help with issues,” the representative told BJ-HC.

Improving digital literacy

Speaking at a roundtable ahead of the UK e-Health Week, NHS England Associate CCIO Harpreet Sood argued that there is a lack of professionals with clinical background able to drive the ‘transformational change’ across the NHS, necessary to ensure smooth implementations of IT systems, without disruptions in care.

At the end of November last year, the Tinder Foundation rebranded itself as the Good Things Foundation, revealing plans to improve digital health literacy:

“One of the key challenges for the UK - and indeed the rest of Europe - is digital health. We need to make sure everyone has the opportunity to benefit from advances in technology which can help them take control of their health, access information and services, contact and communicate with health professionals and make informed choices about their care.

“Digital, social and health inequalities are inextricably linked, and our work has shown us how action on one front - digital - can improve social exclusion and even health outcomes.

“We’re looking forward to extending our work in widening digital participation in health as one of the many things we do as Good Things Foundation,” said Helen Milner, Chief Executive of the organisation.